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  • Autor
    • Zelenka, Jan
    • Christen, Claudio
    • Thalhauser, Josef
    • Warter, Sven
    • Wimmer, Andreas
  • TitelFully Variable Intake Valve Train – Advanced Air Management for Improved Dynamic Performance of Large Bore Gas Engines
  • Datei
  • DOI10.3217/p2bxp-say41
  • Erscheinungsjahr2019
  • Seiten1-16
  • LicenceCC BY-ND
  • ZugriffsrechteCC-BY
  • Konferenz Name29th CIMAC World Congress on Internal Combustion Engines
  • Konferenz OrtVancouver
  • Konferenz StaatCanada
  • Download Statistik67
  • Peer ReviewJa
  • AbstractAs the share of renewable sources in the electricity mix grows, flexible power generation units are increasingly required to respond to the highly fluctuating availability of renewable energy. Modern reciprocating engine power plants are able to ramp up electricity generation within a short time period. Gas engines in particular provide power (electricity, heat) at high efficiency while complying with strict emission legislation. Given the need for grid stability, the requirements for transient operation will continue to increase and must be addressed in gas engine development with improved charging and combustion concepts as well as control strategies. Compliance with emission limits has to be guaranteed. A variable valve timing system on the engine intake (ABB’s VCM®) for power control has been shown to improve engine efficiency and allow for increased power density. Additionally, it enhances flexibility under ambient conditions and fuel quality in steady-state operation. Furthermore, improved transient response can be expected in engines equipped with a variable intake valve train. This paper describes investigations on a lean burn gas engine equipped with a variable valve train on the intake side and demonstrates how transient engine performance can be improved in comparison to a conventional state-of-the-art application with constant Miller timing. The transient performance and control strategies are assessed for power generation applications in grid parallel operation as well as in island grid operation. Following the LEC’s transient development methodology, simulations are carried out using a detailed 0D/1D model of the corresponding multi cylinder engine (MCE) to pre-assess the transient performance potential. The basis for model calibration is provided by a large number of steady-state measurement points from a single cylinder research engine. In the next step, a fast calculating 0D gas exchange model derived from the detailed model is used to set up and calibrate controller structures for power, speed and emissions control using a variable intake valve train. Testing of the concepts developed using simulation is conducted on a single cylinder test bed that allows transient operation. Multi cylinder engine behavior is simulated on the SCE using a Hardware-in-the-Loop approach. This provides insight into the real limitations (knocking, misfire) and real emissions during transient engine operation.